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The Crescent) 



VOLUME XXXIV 



NEWBERG, OREGON, FEBRUARY 21, 1923. 



NUMBER 9 



J 



PACIFIC CAGES GAMES 
WITH ALBANY AND 



Southern Trip Eesults in Two Vic- 
tories for Quaker Team 



The P. C. basketball team journey- 
ed to Albany last Friday and defeat- 
ed Albany College in a fast, exciting 
game 22 to 19. 

After the first five minutes the 
Quakers trailed the leading score by 
several points at different times, but 
by wonderful fighting won handily 
in the final seconds of play. The 
first half ended with the Quakers in 
the rear with an 11 to 10 score and 
when the final period opened Albany 
touched off a vicious offensive move 
but thanks to the Quakers' defense, 
it counted them very little. The fi- 
nal four minutes of play saw P. C, 
strengthened by substitution, hold 
Albany without a basket, while they 
themselves scored four points by Hin- 
shaw's excellent foul throwing. 

Although H. Terrell was high 
point man, the fight and floor work 
of Cook, Hinshaw and Jones, along 
with the great defensive work of 
Armstrong demands special mention, 
as it was through the combined ef- 
forts of the five men that the game 
was won. 

Steincipher led Albany in the 
scoring and was aided by the splendid 
fighting of his team mates. 

Pacific Col. (22) (19) Albany Col. 

Hinshaw, 5 F Cooley 

Cook, 4 F 13, Steincipher 

Terrell, 13 C 2, VanWinkle 

Armstrong G Sox 

Jones G 2, Henderson 

Crozer S 2, Bloom 

Summary — Field goals: P. C 
Cook 2, Terrell 6; Albany College, 
Steincipher 5, Van Winkle 4, Bloom, 
Henderson. Free throws: P. C, Ter- 
rell 1 out of 4, Hinshaw 5 out of 8; 
Albany College, Steincipher 3 out of 
8. 

Referee — Hodson of Albany. 

The contest Saturday at Philomath 
lacked the fight and pep of the Fri- 
day battle but the Quakers were 
never headed at any time. The 
Philomath guards had Terrell well 
covered at all times, but by feeding 
Hinshaw the Quakers piled up a win- 
ning margin. The Quaker defense 
again proved its worth and mosl of 
the Philomath baskets were long 
ones. Hinshaw carried away th,e 
honors of high point man, but was 
aided greatly by all the other mem- 
bers of the team. Kilpatrick led the 
scoring for Philomath. 

Pacific Col. (22) (12) Philomath 

Hinshaw, 16 F C, Kilpatrick 

Cook P 2, Mitchell 

Terrell, 4 C Nisewonder 

Armstrong, G 2, Phinney 

Jones, 2 G Emerick 

Crozer S 2, Haskins 

Summary — Goals: P. C, Hinshaw 
7, Terrell 2, Jones 1; Philomath, 
Kilpatrick 3, Mitchell 1, Haskins 1, 
Phinney 1. Free throws: Hinshaw 
2 out of 4. 



LOCAL PEACE ORATORICAL CON- 
TEST TO BE HELD SOON 



The date of the local Peace Ora- 
torical Contest is soon to be an- 
nounced. This contest serves as 
try-out for the State Peace Contest 
held annually under the auspices of 
the Intercollegiate Oratorical associa- 
tion of Oregon, this year at Willam- 
ette University. 

The Misses Mary and Helen Sea- 
bury, Friends, of New Bedford, 
Mass., offer annually a prize of $25 
to the winner of the peace contest 
in each of the Friends colleges. The 
condition upon which the prize is 
given is that at least three contest- 
ants shall participate in a public 
contest. 

They offer, also, for the winner of 
the state contest, a prize of seventy- 
five dollars and a second prize of 
fifity dollars. The orations winning 
first and second places in the state 
contests are judged by the Misses 
Seabury on thought and composition, 
and a national prize of fifty dollars 
is awarded. 

Since the state peace contest is to 
be held early in April and sincei the 
orations must be in the hands of the 
secretary of the I. O. A. O. two weeks 
before the contests, it may be plainly 
seen that contestants should be get- 
ting very busy, very soon. 

o 

TREFIAN 

At the meeting of the Trefian lit- 
erary society, February 7, hilarity 
was the watchword. The chief ob- 
ject of this meeting was to obtain 
drill in pariamentary procedure, and 
Harriett Hodginn was lected chair- 
man and the meeting came to order. 
Motions, amendments, objections and 
suggestions then almost overcame 
the chairman and the society mem- 
bers. To break the ice, there was 
a motion to the effect that the mar- 
shal straighten the rug. Motion car- 
ried. The matters of the Trefian 
tree's death and the piopsr burial of 
the remains of some defunct guinea 
pigs were heatedly discussed. Var- 
ious committees of investigation, 
both of these subjects and of previ- 
ous committees, were appointed. 
Mildred Tuclun - proposed that some- 
thing be done abouc ihe scand'lous 
behavior of an unnamed society 
member, laid member having slood 
ovr the register for .in (•mire hour 
talking to a. member of the opposite 
sex. Deep discussion of ilie 'meaning 
of "serious matter," •'weighty ques- 
tions" and "hot air" ensued. A com- 
mittee of the whole was employed 
as a better medium for talking the 
matter over. Lucille Clough, it was 
discovered, is an authority on 
"nothing." "The chair" was ignor- 
ant (by her own confession), and 
Miss Lee believes firmly that the fu- 
ture holds long enough time." Since 
the whole discussion finally seemed 
to be about "nothing," the matter 
was laid on the table. It was not 
until the meeting had adjourned 
three times that all complications 
were smoothed out, and the members 
were at liberty. 

o 

Patronize college industries and 
help the needless. Shoe shine, dor- 
mitory parlors, 15c; guaranteed to 
shine until the next rain. Profes- 
sional "pops," jugglers' tricks and 
ancient newspapers while you wait. 



E. R. MARTIN ADDRESSES STU- 
DENTS ON HOME MISSIONS 



E. R. Martin, director of the Amer- 
ican Sunday school union of the Pa- 
cific northwest, addressed the com- 
bined groups of Y. M. and Y. W. 
(luring the regular chapel hour, Wed- 
nesday, his subject being "Home 
Missions." 

"The peril to our democracy lies 
inj the unchristianized majority of 
America," said Mr. Martin. "Nearly 
three fourths of the population is 
without religious instruction of any 
kind." He gave some figures which 
revealed the true situation in the 
United States. More than 27,000,000 
children have no religious environ- 
ment whatever. And among immi- 
grants only one out of ten is being 
reached. 

"Morals and religion are insepara- 
morals will not stand without the 
deeper idealism of religion." He 
cited the findings of a grand jury of 
business men who said, that crime 
among youths was the result of a 
lack of consciousness of personal re- 
ligion. The law cannot replace a 
consciousness of God. 

"The rural life," said Mr. Martin, 
"from which comes our finest leader- 
ship, has become broken and tran- 
sient, resulting in the decay of the 
best community social institutions. 
The Saturday night dance hall has 
replaced the community church, re- 
sulting in the degeneration of rural 
life." 

Mr. Martin touched briefly on the 
work of the Sunday school union, 
showing the great good it is doing 
and the great need that exists. 



COLLEGE BOARD WAS 
GIVEN BANQUET BY 
FACULTY 

Dinner and Toast Program Is Pol- 
lowed by Board Meeting 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES 
TO GIVE EXHIBITION MARCH 15 



On March 15 the physical educa- 
tion classes of the college will give 
a gym exhibition. This will prove to 
be a novel attraction, not only be- 
cause of the interest that has been 
shown in the physical education 
work this year by both students and 
business men of the city, but because 
of the fact that it will be the first 
of its kind in many years. If pres- 
ent interest is any indication of suc- 
cess, this exhibition will go over the 
top. The program will include a 
number of interesting features. The 
business men will be taken through 
a short, snappy exhibition of their 
regular class work. The young wom- 
en's class will give a wand drill, and 
the yong men a general exhibition of 
ground tumbling, combination tum- 
bling and pyramid building. The 
evening will be conducted on the 
"Dutch picnic" plan, visitors and 
performers all sharing an equal part 
of the expense. 



Y. W. 

The Y. W. meeting of February 7 
on the subject of "Personal Work" 
was led by Dilla Tucker. After three 
good songs, Romans 12:9-21 was 
read and successfully applied to the 
life of each one. The meeting closed 
with the concluding thought that in 
order to be the best kind of a per- 
sonal worker, one must keep in 
touch with God. 



It was a particularly happy occa- 
sion when the two groups of people 
who are most directly responsible 
for the work of Pacific College came 
together at Wood-Mar Hall Friday 
eveningf, February 9, tor on. this 
date the faculty entertained the 
members of the college board and 
their wives at dinner. The guests, 
coming from Salem, Portland and 
Newberg, began to arrive about six 
o'clock. The lower hall had| been 
magically transformed between the 
hours of four and six into a recep- 
tion hall, and here a pleasant social 
half hour was spent before dinner 
was announced. 

In the dining room a festive air 
was given by the decorations of daf- 
fodils and candles, and place-cards 
proved an effective means of dis- 
tributing the comipany. An excellent 
dinner was served by the Woman's 
Auxiliary to Pacific College, and live- 
ly conversation, spiced with wit and 
story, made the two hours pass all 
too quickly. 

At the close of the dinner, Presi- 
dent Pennington, acting as toast- 
master, introduced Mrs. Evangeline 
Martin, secretary of the board, who 
spoke of "A More Beautiful Pacific." 
Mrs. Martin emphasized the fact that 
much must be done to make the 
campus artistic and beautiful. Not 
only is this important from the 
standpoint of the student. The at- 
tention everywhere given to parks, 
gardens and grounds makes it im- 
perative that Pacific give due consid- 
eration to beautifying her campus. 

Professor R. W. Lewis then spoke 
of "A More Useful Pacific," point- 
ing to a larger future for the col- 
lege in serving Newberg, the 
churches which maintain her, and 
the young people of the Northwest. 

Dr. T. W. Hester next responded 
to the toast, "A Larger Pacific." 
Pacific's growth, he said .which must 
be immediate and rapid, must come 
as a result of a larger and more 
loyal constituency. The Friends 
church in the Northwest has not 
been aggressive enough in occupy- 
ing new territory. Dr. Hester also 
spoke of the progressive plans which 
the board has laid for the college, 
and which must be carried out at 
once. 

All felt keenly the |absen<(e g|C 
Ezra H. Woodward, who had been 
for so many years president of the 
board, and appreciated deeply the 
presence of Amanda Woodward, who 
spoke at the close of the program 
of her constant devotion to the in- 
terests of the college. 

Throughout the program, and no- 
tably in the remarks of the toast- 
master, there was emphasized the 
need of more intimate acquaintance 
between the members of the board 
and the faculty. Muoh stress was 
laid upon the need of coopratlon in 



(Continued on page three) 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at post office at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



Royal Gettmann Editor-in-Chief 

Ben Darling Assistant Editor 

Flora E. Campbell. . . .Society Editor 

Cecil P. Hinshaw Sports Editor 

John Chenevert. .Business Manager 
Therman Evans .... Asst. Bus. Mgr. 
Davis Woodward. .Circulation Mgr. 

REPORTERS — Lucille Johnson, 
Cecil R. Hinshaw, Harriett Hodgin, 
Davis Woodward, Esther Haworth, 
Olive Terrell, Jewel Williams, Char- 
lotte Jones and Florence Heater. 

Terms: $1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



We noticed in the Linfield Review 
that they won an easy basketball 
game from Pacific by a three-point 
margin and with two "stars" out of 
th lineup at that. Come to think 
about it, our team work that even- 
ing was also dreadfully cut up on 
account of the illness of Walter 
Cook, who was under the doctor's 
care the evening before the game. 
"Beef" Jones was rather headachy 
and Terrell wasn't feeling well, as is 
shown by his sixten points. As a 
matter of fact all our fellows were 
kind of under the weather, and not 
playing their usual game. So we 
are sorry about Linfield's easy vic- 
tory with a Becond-string team, and 
hope to have a strong enough team 
next year at least to keep the score 
within reasonable bounds. 



Although the college has always 
been working to meet the require- 
ments set by the United States Bu- 
reau of Education, the greatest ad- 
vances have been made since the visit 
of Dr. Zook, which occurred in 
March, 1922. 

Since last commencement the lab- 
oratory equipmnt has been doubled, 
the new chemistry building erected, 
and the practically complete sepa- 
ration of academy and college in 
buildings, faculty and student body 
has been effected. The standards of 
the colleg faculty have been raised, 
each member now being required to 
hold the master's degree. Two 
thousand carefully selected books 
have been added to the library and 
the entire quipment of the college 
has been improved to meet the re- 
quirements of the bureau, and the 
only standard not approved is that 
of financial reserves. The Bureau 
of Education requires two hundred 
thousand dollars in cash above all 
indebtedness.. 

This of course means that the 
pledges secured in the last drive 
cannot be counted in this required 
sum and all the property and cam- 
paign pledges must be converted in- 
to cash or negotiable notes. 

The task of raising this sum was 
considered at the last board meeting 
and Stacy J. McCracken has been 
called to take charge of the cam- 
paign. Mr. McCracken will be re- 
membered for his work during the 
last few weeks of the campaign in 
1921, and with his services the fi- 
nancial work will be completed in 
the not distant future and Pacific's 
hope* for standardization realized. 



Newberg, Feb. 15. — Special re- 
lease.) — Academy women piqued by 
riuriosity and vexed by the prolonged 
silence of the male sex declare a de- 
termination to found the order of 
"The Secret Woman." 



Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



DORM DOPE 

Dilla Tucker Is very happy over 
having received her auto ride. 



Mildred tore the ligaments in her 
foot while running to catch the train 
to Portland. She is able to walk 
again however, by keeping her foot 
braced. 

The dorm family feared Louise 
had tonsilitis as she did not appear 
on Monday morning as usual. How- 
ever, she is with us again and feel- 
ing well. 



Audrey Chenoweth, the baby of 
our family, is critically ill. Three 
doctors have been summoned and 
none of them know the cause of her 
illness or can break up her fever. 



Monday morning the inhabitants 
of "Frozen Inn" discovered half a 
dozen icicles hanging from the ceil- 
ing of the room. How they got there 
and disappeared no one can prove. 
All they know is that the roof leaks. 



Anyone is welcome to the G. 
Bates shoe' shining parlor at the en- 
trance of the dorm. Good service 
and cheap rates. 



"Giggles" has become the favorite 
dinner dish. 



The speed with which the actqrs 
dress, as related and illustrated at 
lyceum, was an old story to' the four 
frollicking f realties who served Tit the 
faculty and board banquet on Friday 
night. 



If it's not midnight oil that's 
burned during the meetings, it's 
four o'clock in the morning. 



Letters have been received from 
those members of our family who left 
us at the beginning of this term. 



Mysterious Valentines also found 
their way into the hands of some. 



The greatest birthday supper in 
the family this year was the one on 
the evening of "Valentine's day. Five 
birthdays were celebrated at this 
time. The most interesting feature 
was pink and white ice cream. The 
pink was a heart in the center. Each 
one told what was becoming of his 
heart. Such remarks' as "Mine is 
cold," "Mine is frozen," "Mine is 
broken," were offered, but to cap 
the climax, Hubert A. said his was 
disappearing. 



G. Bates, when being chased 
through the snow: "My, I'm glad 
I've got legs." 



Mildred H. getting ready for srhool 
about 9:00 a. m.: "Tell them I'm on 
the road." 



Babe when the bell rings: "O, 
shoot the luck anyway." 

o ■ 

First Rooster — "What's the matter 
with Mrs. Brahma?" 

Second Ditto — "Shell shock. Ducks 
came out of the eggs she was sit- 
ting on." 

o 

Save the date, February 23, after 
school. 

o 

Voice from dark parlor — "My but 
your nose is cold." 

Helpful Brother (to suspicious 
father) — "Gee, Pop, I bet Rover is 
in the parlor again." 



BOARD ANNOUNCES FACULTY 
CHANGES E0R NEXT YEAR 



Perry D. Macy, for three years 
head of the department of history, 
has resigned, and expects to teach 
in New England, from which field 
Pacific college called him three 
years ago. Chester Jones, head of 
the department of chemistry, came 
to pacific for a year to fill the place 
of F. W. Perisho, the head of the 
department for eight years, who is 
doing graduate work in the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. Mr. Jones will go 
on with his work for the doctor's 
degree next year, probably in the 
University of Oregon. Grace Mich- 
ener Conover will cease to be head 
of the department of education* She 
will be succeeded by her husband. 
Mary E. Pennington, head of the 
English work in the academy, will 
do graduate work either in the Uni- 
versity of Oregon or in the T. Wis- 
tar Brown graduate school of Haver- 
ford college. 

D.wight W. Michener, now candi- 
date for the master's degree in 
Haverford college, will succeed Mr. 
Conove rat the head of the depart- 
ment i of economics and sociology. 
Miss Ardis Roberts, now doing grad- 
uate work in Bryn Mawr, will suc- 
ceed Miss Pennington .in the acad- 
emy English work. F. W. Perisho 
will return to his work at the head 
of the department of chemistry. No 
successor has been chosen for Mr. 
Macy. 

o 

AN EDUCATIONAL TRIUMPH 

A senior sat him down one day to 

choose his bachelor's thesis, 
And subjects new, and old, and near, 

and far away as Greece is. 
In German, Lit. and Chemistry fired 

his imagination. 
But something safe had more appeal 

— his major, education. 
"How Girls' Consumption of Hair 

Nets Keeps Equal Pace With 

Learning," 
"How Ears Turned Out and Toes 

Turned in Show Strong Ambitious 

Yearning," 
"How Gorgeous Neckties All Are 

Worn by Imbecile or Moron," 
"The Hat Betrays the Mental Power 

of Him Whose Head It's Wore On." 
Such themes as these gave ample 
chance to exploit all in college. 
He chose one, bought a card index 

to tabulate his knowledge, 
And when his survey was survyed, 

the resume typed neatly, 
He wrote a careful "Guide to Use," 

annotated quite completely. 
In which he said, "Now, do not think 

I am not prone to error; 
Coincidence of talent with a certain 

shade of hair or 
The red necktie with idiocy may be 

just a chance relation; 
But here's my gift to science, my 

statistical libation." 
Prof. Educator welcomed it with 

hearty acclimation 
And presented extracts from it in his 

doctor's dissertation. 



Black 122 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 

714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 

THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION PRUGGIST 



VINCENT'S FEED STORE 

808 First Street 

Best Quality of 
FEED AND FLOUR 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 
Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 
NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



BAGS 
TRUNKS and GLOVES 

703 First Street 
A. C. SMITH 



VISIT THE FAIR 
5c and 10c Store 
WALLACE & SON 

607 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



STUDENTS 

For the easiest shave and 
most up-to-date hair cut, 
go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 
< J 



Valentine Darts 

They didn't say so but everyone 
knows that Prof. Mary Pennington, 
Gladys Scott and Robert Shattuck 
each received a "Won't you be my 
Valentine?" 

Dickey Boy was the most happy 
recipient of fine valentines on Wed- 
nesday last. C. R., who received, — 
say with sobs, — nary a one, wishes to 
know the secret of thy charms, Dick- 
ey. 

After wasting an afternoon in 
making candied valentines which 
proved "just too soft to send," Es- 
ther Delight and Scotty realized that 
crystalized sweetness required much 
beating. 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, Prop. 

Ice cream and candies. We fea- 
ture the famous Lowney's Candies. 
Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 



"Learnin'," said Uncle Eben, "is 
mighty useful if you can use it, but 
It's a drawback if it don't do nuffin' 
but permote conversation." 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 

■ 

t > 

SOCIETY AND COMMERCIAL 

Printing 

AT THE GRAPHIC OFFICE 



FRESHMEN ROMP AT SPRING- 
BROOK FRIDAY EVENING 



At four o'clock on Friday evening 
the freshman class, with their chap- 
erones, Miss Lee and Professor Jones, 
boarded the train for Springbrook, 
taking with them bundles of various 
sizes. The gay party got off the 
train at Springbrook and after a 
walk of half a mile, stopped next 
door to Heater's place in a romantic 
and charming 'cabin. Aj cheerful 
fire was burning in the fireplace. 
"Very costly furniture consisting of 
boxes and boards afforded comfort. 

The freshies report a very merry 
time, and Miss Lee said it was the 
best time she'd ever had. The fun 
began by a game of fox and geese, 
in which all but little lame Shortie 
participated. After that came a real 
snow fight. By this time each one 
was sufficiently cold and tired 
enough to enjoy a hot fire. They 
sat around the fireplace and roasted 
wienies which were later relished 
with buns and pickles. Miss Lee 
took the prize for corn popping, and 
while the little green freshmen en- 
joyed popcorn and apples, she told 
them some real ghostlike stories 
which almost frightened the little 
folks. Needless to say, they were 
sorry to leave so soon, but had to 
catch the seven o'clock train home, 
in order to be back in time to at- 
tend meeting at the church that 
night. 

o 

DEBATE TRY-OUTS TO BE HELD 
FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 23 



RECITAL GIVEN BY EXPRESSION 
CLASS IS ENTERTAINING 



The furnace room confabs are not 
in it with what you will hear at the 
tryouts, so don't miss it for any rea- 
son. The final debat try-outs will 
be held next Friday afternoon at 
4:00, in the chapel, at which time 
you will hear Pacific's champion de- 
baters. (Of course we don't know 
yet who they are ,but we plan to find 
out then.) The time before the de- 
bates begin will be taken up with 
songs and yells, when Dedee and 
Dick will be in charge. Remember 
that this is the first chance you have 
had to show your interest in debate 
since the rally we had last fall, and 
now you can see how hard your de- 
baters have been working. At the 
try-outs three short and snappy de- 
bates will be given, and from these 
debaters will be chosen the two 
teams of two members each, that will 
represent Pacific in the Triangular 
debates the evening of April 6, the 
negative team traveling to Albany, 
and the affirmative team remaining 
at home to meet the Linfield de- 
baters. 

Forensic Manager. 
o 

PACIFIC TO HAVE A TEN-PIECE 
ORCHESTRA 



The first rehearsal of the newly 
organized college orchestral was held 
last Tuesday evening after school 
and judging from the enthusiasm 
and ability shown by the memhers it 
will become a permanent feature of 
the school. Kienle's music house 
has kindly lent the orchestra a set 
of concert folios and other orches- 
trations have been sent for, so with 
a few more rehearsals the Pacific 
College Concert orchestra will be 
ready to make its initial bow. 

The personnel is: Violins, Winona 
Smith, Clifton Parrett, Royal Gett- 
mann, Herbert Owen, Florence Heat- 
er; 'cellos, Professor Jones, Professor 
Lewis; clarinet, Howard Nottage; 
trumpet, Theo Baker; piano, Gladys 
Scott. All the members are mem- 
bers of the student body or faculty, 
with the exception of Theo Baker, 
who plays trumpet in the orchestra 
of the local high school. 



The members of the college ex- 
pression class gave an interesting 
program in Wood-Mar Hall on the 
evening of February 5. Due to the 
advertising and the fact that the 
final examinations were over, the 
attendance was large, all the seats 
on the floor being taken and the 
balcony also being wel filled. 

The Quality of the readings gave 
evidence of the splendid work of 
the class under Mrs. Conover. The 
average excellence was high and the 
program was very well arranged, it 
was as follows: 

"The St. John's Fund," (Elmer 
H7 Green) Lucile Clough. 

"The Boogah Man" (Paul Law- 
rence Dunbar) ; "Try Smiling" 
(Anonymous), Gladys Scott. 

Selection from "A Tale of Two 
Cities" (Charles Dickens), Harold P. 
Mills. 

"The Initiation" (Booth Tark- 
iffgton), Walter Cook. 

"The Sign of the Cross" (Anony- 
mous), Reta P. Hansen. 

"The Boy Who Stuttered and the 
Girl Who Lisped (Louis Weslyn); 
"Willie's Prayer" (Anonymous), E. 
Delight Carter. 

"After-Dinner Apology of le Comte 
Crapaud" (Edmund Vance Cooky; 
"Jilted" (Paul Lawrence Dunbar) ; 
"Coquette Conquered" (Paul Law- 
rence Dunbar), Lucile Johnson. 

"Penrod's Letter" (Booth Tark- 
ington), Royal Gettmann. 

"The Lost Word" (Henry Van" 
Dyke), Mary K. Elliott. 

Lucille Clough's portrayal of the 
character development of the small 
boy was excellent and Harold Mills' 
presentation of the guillotine scene 
was equally effective. Chuckles 
burst from the audience as Walter 
Cook and Royal Gettman recounted 
some of the pranks of Booth Tark- 
ington's "Penrod." 

The readings with piano accom- 
paniment given by Delight Carter 
and Gladys Scott were greeted with 
much genuine applause. The selec- 
tions of Reta Hansen and Mary El- 
liott pleased the audience as did Lu- 
cille Johnson's French dialect num- 
ber. 

Florence Lee was to give "From 
Italy to America," but because of 
illness she was unable to give it 
until chapel, February 16. This was 
given in the Italian tongue and in 
costume and was unique and very 
enjoyable. 

o 

Crescent Gossip Bureau, Newberg, 
Feb. 12. — (By special release of 
Dame Rumor.) — Certain gentlemen 
of the Academy are enthusiastically 
promoting the organization of a se- 
cret order for the cultivation of lit- 
rary and musical appreciation. The 
personnel of the order and the na- 
ture of its organization are unknown. 
Closed doors and secret sessions have 
baffled reporters' attempts at pub- 
licity. The public considers Exceed- 
ingly Round and Exceedingly 
Straight as sponsors of the agita- 
tion. 



MISTERIOSO DRAMATICS 

It was a dark, dank, drowsy, 
dreary day. Long before the sun ap- 
peared great preparations were 
made for the festivities, due to start 
at five fifty-nine. In the castle all \ 
was nearing completion. The draw- j 
bridge had been let down ready for 
the expected guests. 

But hush! A door slides softly 
open. Then silence. Ah! A shout. , 
What ho? Within there, within . 
there! The enemy have forced the 
stronghold and are pillageing the i 
stores. To arms, all ye valiant and : 
true! To arms! 

The enemy are overcome and [ 
thrust without the walls. Once more | 
peace inside the wall. Once more 
peace inside, but outside — ah no. 

The bandit chief has captured one 
of the guests. The knight gave roy- 
al battle, but only one nose was 
bloodied. 

Too bad! Then like a star in the 
early morning comes the second 
knight; with a shout he dashes to 
the rescue. Frightened by this sud- ! 
den onslaught the bandits flee but ' 
not before they have received well- . 
earned chastisement. 

The knight repair to the castle. 
They are royally welcomed and feast- I 
ed. Later comes the third knight, ' 
likewise set upon by, the bandits i 
out side the castle walls, likewise 
heroically rescued. Once more- peace 
reigns and merriment and pancakes 
are enjoyed by all. 

By all, was it said? Ah, no. In- 
gredients horrible to relate are 
shifted into the unconsumed pan- \ 
cake batter, and the whole is shifted ' 
into the squirming bandit chief. 
There is much not enjoyed by the 
bandits. 

No, this is not "Ye Tales of Ye 
Olden Tymes," — merely a quiet par- 
ty of the "Shifters." 



How would it be for the fresh- 
men (and other) men to remove 
their caps in the college building — 
especially when requested to do so by 
upper class women? For further in- 
formation as to register etiquette, 
see B. A. Darling. 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KIENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 
Best of Bread; Finest Cakes, 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



CITY CHAMPIONSHIP GAME FOR 
SATURDAY NIGHT 



Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



Coach Jones has arranged for a 
basketball game with the Newberg 
Legion team Saturday night ' and if 
the Quakers put up the fight that 
j they have in the last three games, it 
' should result in a scrappy contest. 
! The Legion team, has been beaten 
I only twice in the last two years ,and 
is recognized as one of the best teams 
■ in the state, and this is Pacific's 
' opportunity to make a reputation. 

Although the admission has been 
set at fifty cents, all college students 
will be admitted free, provided they 
give the team the backing they de- 



serve. 



Yon Get Your Money's Worth 

at the 

GEM BARBER SHOP 

E. L. MORLEY, PROPRIETOR 



Gossip 

Bessye — "My dear, so gladja 
come. We were jus' talking abou- 
cha." 

Marge — "Thank ya, dear, that's 
why I came." 



RYGG THE TAILOR 

Tailoring, French Dry Cleaning, 
Alterations, Pressing 

602% FIRST STREET 



Willie — "I looked through the key- 
hole last night when May's fellow 
was calling on her." 

Father — "And what did you find 
out?" 

Willie — "The electric light." 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Delivery before and after school 
Phone Red 66 

MOORE & SON 



First Flapper — "The cheek of that 
conductor. He glared at me as if 
I hadn't paid my fare." 

Second Ditto — "And what did you 
do?" 

First F. — "I just glared back at 
him as if I had." 



The man who watches the clock 
will never be the man of the hour. 



"Is Jackson a self-made man?" 
"Oh, no, he was married several 
years before he became prosperous?" 



Brooks — "What do you do back in 
Montana?" 

Jones — "Well, in summer we fish 
and love the girls. And then in the 
winter there's no fishing." 

o 

COLLEGE BOARD WAS GIVEN 
BANQUET BY FACULTY 



(Continued from page one) 



carrying out the plans for a larger 
Pacific. And when the company dis- 
persed it was with the feeling cf 
new visions and a new courage, as a 
result of the evening's fellowship. 



Phones: Res. Blue 121 Hours: 
Office Red 140 9 to 12, 2 to 6 

DR. ELTON B. JONES D. C, Ph.C. 

LICENSED CHIROPRACTOR 
702% First St. Newberg, Or. 
By appointm't evening & Sunday 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



Will B. Brooks 
PRINTER 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



Debate try-outs in the chapel af- 
ter school Friday. 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 

Pressing, Cleaning 
Repairing 

314 FIRST ST. NEWBERG, OR. 



"Listen In" 

WHAT YOU EAT AND WHAT 
YOU WEAR 

Get it at the 
"GOOD GOODS" HOME 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



FRANCIS JOYNER PLEASES LYCE- 
UM GOERS WITH READINGS 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

THE STORE OP QUALITY 

Furniture, Carpets, 
Undertakers 

500 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 
Physician and Surgeon 
Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, - OREGON 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



Yours for Service and Quality 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



Francis Joyner proved himself to 
be a real artist when he appeared 
before a large audience February 10 
as the fifth number of the lyceum 
cours e in his "Moments with Great 
Actors." His work was exceptional 
and, judging from the applause, his 
hearers were more than pleased. 

Mr. Joyner has spent years study- 
ing the methods of several of the 
leading actors of the country, and his 
program, was made up of scenes from 
four different plays in which he took 
the part of the leading character.. In 
each case he reproduced the char- 
acter as portrayed by some noted ac- 
tor. 

The first number was taken from 
"The Bachelor's Romance." The 
second was a representation of Sir 
Henry Irving's "Shylock," from the 
"Merchant of Venice," and was an 
unusually fine piece of work. The 
third was taken from a play of a 
lighter nature entitled "The First 
Year," a portrayal of a young couple 
meeting the realities of married life. 
His last characterization was from 
the closing scene of the famous play, 
"The Copperhead," as given by Li- 
onel Barrymore. 

An outstanding feature of the 
whole entertainment was his unusual 
ability of making the absent charac- 
ters almost visible to the audience 
through his realistic conversation 
and bearing, though he was alone on 
the platform. 



HEARD OVER THE REGISTER 



Orchestra music. 



Lawrence Crozer, (to Wilfred, 
. who is leaning against him) — "Say, 
; what do you think I am, a Saturday 
; Evening Post?" 

| W. C. — "No, I know you're a 
Woman's Home Companion." 



A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



Jalk Elford — "I wish I> were a la- 
dies' man." 

Fair One, who shall be nameless — 
"Oh, so do I, Jack." 



Co Ed. — "Oh, I dreamed you took 
me to a game last night." 

Ed.- -"Well, that excitement will 
keep me going for another six 
months." (And they kill men like 
Lincoln.) 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 

Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171. 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 

E. W. HODSON, Reg. Phar. 
School Supplies, Drags, 
Confections 

Corner First and Meridian 



SHOE SHINE PARLOR 
Best of Shines Efficient Service 
Candy Bars, Good Confections 
BOB WALKER 



Ben Darling has decided that it 
was to no avail that he got all his 
experience. It seems that the faculty 
neglected to add it to his grades. 

Iva Dell Crozer- "Paul, where are 
my rubbers?" 

Paul Brown — "The last time I 
wore them, I put 'em right baak 
where I got them." 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 
Phone Red 37 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
ROLL OF HONOR BANK 
Capital and Surplus $100,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



"Am I blushing?" 

"Say, you'd make a dollar's worth 
of tomato soup look like a snow- 
ball." 

Frosh — "I've been trying to think 
cf a word for two weeks." 

Soph — "How about 'fortnight?' " 



all. 



The registrar thinks that will be 



My Dear Aunt Lou: 

Please tell me how I can know 
that a man loves me for myself, as 
his predestined mate, not just be- 
cause I can keep him guessing. 

Yours of sweet and twenty. 



Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. 



BANK 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



STUDENTS! GET YOUR BASKETBALL SUPPLIES 

AT 

Parker Hardware Co. 



When you sit down to a meal you like to know that your food came 
from a store where reputation counts — a store where best quality 
goods are really best quality. Honest values make us grow. 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM 



CHEERFUL SERVICE AT 

Larkin-Prince Hardware Co. 



Campbell's 



Allen's Cactus Crystals 



Line of 



Russell Gilbert' 

Krause's 

Thompsen's 



Chocolates 



Lunch 
Goods 



Candies 



Exclusive lines 

Chocolates 



Are 



Johnson's 
Hoffler's 
Quimby's 



610 First Street 



King 

of Sweets 



Winter Drinks 
All Kinds 

School Supplies 
Kodak Films 

Newberg, Oregon